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Touch of India Recycled Cross-Shoulder Tote

Item # 33189
No longer available

Deliciously opulent and touched with the romance of hand-crafted detail, our Touch of India Recycled Cross-Shoulder Tote features stunning pieces of fabric that have found a second home in this bag. Fine embroidery, sequin, and bead work are brought together with colorful folksy stitching for a tote that can carry it all in style.

Made of recycled fabric by artisans in the Barmer region of Rajasthan, India, these totes bring economic opportunity to farmer families who live in drought prone regions. During times when agriculture isn't possible, these works of art are the main source of income, which helps develop the community by bringing education, electricity and healthcare.

Red or Blue. Roomy interior features a small velcro pouch for your essentials and tie and toggle closures at the top. Wide shoulder strap has velcro flap pouch, perfect for cell phone or mp3 player.

Bag measures 35" L including strap (88.9 cm) and 14" W x 7" D (35.6 x 17.8 cm). Strap measures 4" W (10.2 cm). Handmade in and fairly traded from India.

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Artisan: Fabric artisans in India

Artisan Fabric artisans in India

Kailash Bahan, age 42 (shown in the yellow sari) and Ganeshi Bai, age 38 (in the pink sari, far right) are part of an all-women cooperative in western Rajasthan, India. Having learned the art of hand appliqué from fellow village women, they are now passing on the art to the next generation.

The cooperative currently has 272 women practicing hand appliqué, living in small villages through the region. Once a week they travel to the cooperative's headquarters to collect more materials, submit their work, and receive payment.

Earnings from their handicrafts help not only their own families, but the entire community. As a result of the increased flow of income to the region, there are now medical centers providing basic health facilities, electricity produced from solar energy, evening schools for kids, and vocational colleges for women.

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